Dubs in the Shrubs (VW show)

Last weekend, we pulled Moby out of winter hibernation and without so much as a warm up drive, took off on a four-hour cruise to Yardville, New Jersey to attend Dubs in the Shrubs, a VW campout and show hosted by Old School Euros CC.  The day was gorgeous, 80 degrees (F) and sunny, perfect for a long drive in a wonderful machine missed very much over winter.  So perfect was the day, that everyone else decided to stay home and get some spring yard work out of the way thereby leaving the roads open for us to sit back and enjoy – a rarity around these parts. Yardville, however, was not our first stop.  Before we could pop the top and put our feet up with other campers, we headed 10 miles farther north to meet Tom who, along with his children, then drove south with us to enjoy the weekend’s events and meetup with our dear friend Monica – it has been at least 16-17 years since the three of us hit the same show.  I have few other friends that exhibit such enthusiasm and excitement just because they are standing in the middle of a crowd of old VWs, and it seemed as if we never took that long break.  In addition to the reunion, Martha added great companionship and great enthusiasm herself as she patiently waited for the nut she married to stop bouncing around taking photos of engines, wheels, and such. All in all, it was a great show, the host club was impressively organized and incredibly welcoming.  There were many good discussions around the campfire and throughout the weekend.  A very different assortment of cars attended this show than what we normally see at our local Virginia events and included some very old examples of buses and beetles. I even reconnected with a respected parts vendor whom I used heavily during my early VW years in NJ.  Dubs in the Shrubs will definitely be on our show list for next year and hope to add a few other northern shows as well.

OK, so the trip up wasn't completely without incident.  With about an hour to go, I heard a fiant noise and looked down to see the generator light on and CHT rising.  After pulling over, we found that the fan belt gave up.  After a 5-minute roadside installation of the spare, we were on our way again.  Good thing we we're headed to a show, we purchased another spare for the ride home.

OK, so the trip north wasn’t completely without incident. With about an hour to go, I heard a faint noise and looked down to see the generator light on and CHT rising. After pulling over, we found that the fan belt gave up. After a 5-minute roadside installation of the spare, we were on our way again. Good thing we we’re headed to a show; we purchased another spare for the ride home.

We have arrived!

We have arrived!

Campers all setup and ready to enjoy the evening. (Photo credit: Tom)

Campers all setup and ready to enjoy the evening. (Photo credit: Tom)

Panoramic shot of bus row during the show on Sunday. (Photo credit: Martha)

Panoramic shot of bus and beetle rows during the show on Sunday. (Photo credit: Martha)

Monica brought her '71 Ghia, which was thoroughly enjoyed by Tom's kids. (Photo credit: Tom)

Monica brought her ’71 Ghia, which was thoroughly enjoyed by Tom’s kids. (Photo credit: Tom)

'59 camper.  According to the owner, it's one of 27 still around.  It's virtually untouched and only clear coated on the outside to protect the original paint and hinder rust. (photo credit: Tom)

’59 camper decked out with vintage camping gear and recently brought east from California. According to the driver, there aren’t many of these early campers still around. It’s undergone some restoration and body work, but care was given to maintain the original look.  The exterior was clear-coated to protect the original paint. I managed to find the original ad while researching this post and am linking to it for as long as it lasts on the web.  (photo credit: Tom)

Attached to the '59 camper was a '59 U-haul trailer converted by Westfalia for use as a camping trailer.  I forget the exact number, but the owner stated this was 1 of 5 or so know to exist today.

Still attached to the ’59 camper was a Westfalia camping trailer.  According to the driver, the trailer is a ’56 U-haul trailer converted by Westfalia in ’57, but the ad linked above states it’s a ’64. I was unable to confirm a date, but in either case, the trailer is even more rare than the camper and just a utterly fantastic edition. (Photo credit: Tom)

Rear view.

Rear view.

Inside the canvas covered trailer is a cot that attaches to the trailer walls.  Easier for storage so other camping equipment can fit.  Notice the interior light above.  It is wired to the trailer and bus.

Inside the canvas covered trailer is a cot that attaches to the trailer walls. Easier for storage so other camping equipment can fit. Notice the interior light above that is wired to through the trailer to the bus.

'53 beetle and '77 camper.

1950, ’53 beetles and ’77 camper.

Moby ready to show.

Moby (with tent) ready to show.

OG paint '58 panel bus.  Workhorse for a rug company.

OG paint ’58 panel split-window bus. A very cool workhorse for a rug cleaning company.

The bus was hit by an SUV in the rear driver's corner.  The owner took it to an artist who meticulously pounded out the dent and saved the paint.  It was a very impressive repair!

The bus was hit by an SUV in the rear driver’s corner. The owner took it to an artist who meticulously pounded out the dents and saved the paint along with the original metal. It was a very impressive repair and story.  I found the detailed story on The Samba.

Beautiful1950 standard beetle.  No turn signal lights and a split rear-window.

Beautiful 1950 beetle. No turn signal lights and a split rear-window.

Semaphore on the '50 beetle (hard see in the daylight, but it lights up when extended. These served as turn signals before flashing lights.

Semaphore on the ’50 beetle (hard see in the daylight, but it lights up when extended). These served as turn signals before flashing lights.

1957 standard beetle with semiphores.  The split rear window is just visible.

1957 standard beetle with semaphores. The split rear window is just visible.

The 36 hp engines on these '50's VWs were a lot of fun to see.  Such a strange fuel pump and I absolutely was taken by the upper tube through which the spark plugs wires pass.  I wish the kept this on later models - makes the engine compartment look so much tidier

The engines on these early VWs were a lot of fun to see. I was absolutely taken by the tube located above the manifold through which the spark plugs wires pass. I wish they kept this feature on later models – makes the engine compartment look so much tidier.

1967 camper, wow!

Gorgeous ’67 camper.

Absolutely beautiful '65 double cab.

Absolutely beautiful ’65 double cab.

Martha is dreaming of a new convertible.

Martha is dreaming of a new convertible.

This great single cab pickup is a work of art with its wavy bed, putty filled dents, and rust holes.  Sometimes, these cars are more interesting when not restored and show their history.

With its wavy bed, putty-filled dents, rust holes, and brand new wheels, this early bay window single cab is a work of art. Sometimes, these cars are more interesting when not restored and still show their history.

Everyone, and I mean everyone, should have a pair of these pants!! (Photo credit: Tom)

Everyone, and I mean everyone, should have a pair of these pants!! (Photo credit: Tom)

The four of us before the show ended on Sunday.

The five of us before the show ended on Sunday.

Top 33 award.

Moby’s Top 33 award.

Very cool camshaft with speedometer clock Farthest Traveled award.  The odometer is set to the date of the show.  My favorite trophy by far!

Very cool camshaft with speedometer turned clock for Farthest Traveled award. The odometer is set to the date of the show. My favorite trophy by far and it definitely makes up for the lost fan belt and blown wiper fuse (the latter suffered on the journey home).

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One thought on “Dubs in the Shrubs (VW show)

  1. Pingback: Gambrill State Park, Maryland | Zero to Sixty . . .Eventually

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